Minnesota Golf Association

119th U.S. Open Fact Sheet

June 7, 2019


June 13-16, 2019, Pebble Beach Golf Links, Pebble Beach, Calif.

PAR AND YARDAGE                
Pebble Beach Golf Links will be set up at 7,075 yards and will play to a par of 35-36—71. The yardage for each round of the championship will vary due to course setup and conditions.
Pebble Beach Golf Links Hole By Hole            
Hole 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Total
Par 4 4 4 4 3 5 3 4 4 35
Yardage 380 516 404 331 195 523 109 428 526 3,412
                     
Hole 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Total
Par 4 4 3 4 5 4 4 3 5 36
Yardage 495 390 202 445 580 397 403 208 543 3,663

ARCHITECTS
Jack Neville and Douglas S. Grant designed Pebble Beach Golf Links, which opened in 1919.
 
WHO CAN ENTER               
The championship is open to any professional golfer and any amateur golfer with a Handicap Index® not exceeding 1.4. Entries closed on April 24.
 
ENTRIES
In 2019, the USGA accepted 9,125 entries, the sixth-highest total in U.S. Open history. The record of 10,127 entries was set in 2014. There were 9,049 entries filed in 2018.
 
LOCAL QUALIFYING  
Local qualifying, played over 18 holes, was conducted at 109 sites in the U.S. and one in Canada from April 29-May 13. There were 14 local qualifying sites in both California and Florida, the most of any states. Texas hosted seven local qualifiers, while New York and Pennsylvania had five.
 
SECTIONAL QUALIFYING      
In 2019, sectional qualifying, played over 36 holes, was held at eight U.S. sites in the states of California, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, New York, Ohio and Washington on June 3 and one site in Texas on May 20. For the 15th consecutive year, Japan and England hosted international sectional qualifying, which was played on May 27 and June 3, respectively. A sectional qualifier was contested for the first time in Canada on June 3.
 
CHAMPIONSHIP FIELD         
The starting field of 156 golfers will be cut after 36 holes to the low 60 scorers (and ties).
 
SCHEDULE OF PLAY            
Eighteen holes of stroke play are scheduled each day from June 13 (Thursday) through June 16 (Sunday). In the event of a tie after 72 holes, a two-hole aggregate playoff will take place following the completion of Sunday’s final round.
 
2018 CHAMPION
The U.S. Open produced a repeat champion for the third time in the post-World War II era when Brooks Koepka won at Shinnecock Hills Golf Club in Southampton, N.Y., last June. Koepka, who also won the 2017 U.S. Open at Erin Hills, carded a final-round 68 for a one-stroke victory over Tommy Fleetwood. Sidelined for four months earlier in the year due to a wrist injury, Koepka became the first to successfully defend his crown since Curtis Strange 29 years ago. Koepka, 28, of West Palm Beach, Fla., was one of four players who started the final round tied for the lead at 3 over par. He made clutch pars on holes 12 and 14 and stuffed his wedge approach on the par-5 16th to within 4 feet to a set up a birdie and a two-stroke lead. Even a 72-hole bogey could not prevent him from hoisting the trophy. Fleetwood, who started his final round 2 ½ hours before the final pairing of Tony Finau and Daniel Berger teed off, fired a 63 to match the lowest round in championship history to finish in the runner-up position. Dustin Johnson, the 2016 champion, mustered an even-par 70 while playing with Koepka and finished third at 3-over 283.

TITLE DEFENSE
Brooks Koepka is attempting to become the second player to win three consecutive U.S. Open Championships after his victories at Erin Hills in 2017 and Shinnecock Hills Golf Club in 2018. Willie Anderson, a Scottish professional, won his third in a row at Myopia Hunt Club in South Hamilton, Mass., in 1905, a two-stroke triumph over Alex Smith. Anderson and Koepka are among seven players to win in consecutive years. The group includes John J. McDermott (1911, 1912), a-Robert T. Jones Jr. (1929, 1930), Ralph Guldahl (1937, 1938), Ben Hogan (1950, 1951) and Curtis Strange (1988, 1989).

WHAT THE WINNER RECEIVES
Among the benefits enjoyed by the U.S. Open winner are:
  • A U.S. Open exemption for the next 10 years
  • An invitation to the next five Masters Tournaments
  • An invitation to the next five Open Championships, conducted by The R&A
  • An invitation to the next five PGA Championships
  • An invitation to the next five Players Championships
  • Exempt status on the PGA Tour for five years.
 
QUALIFYING FOR THE OTHER MAJORS        
The top 10 finishers (and ties) are exempt into the following year’s U.S. Open. The top four finishers (and ties) are invited to next year’s Masters Tournament.
 
HISTORY
This is the 119th U.S. Open Championship. The U.S. Open, which was first played in 1895, was not contested for two years (1917-1918) during World War I and for four years (1942-1945) during World War II. The youngest winner of the U.S. Open is 19-year-old John McDermott, who won in 1911; he is among nine players age 21 or younger who have won the U.S. Open. The oldest winner is Hale Irwin, who was 45 and playing on a special exemption when he won his third U.S. Open title in 1990. Irwin also won in 1974 and 1979.
 
There are four four-time U.S. Open winners: Willie Anderson (1901, 1903, 1904, 1905), amateur Bob Jones (1923, 1926, 1929, 1930), Ben Hogan (1948, 1950, 1951, 1953), and Jack Nicklaus (1962, 1967, 1972, 1980).
 
Only six players have won the Masters and U.S. Open titles in the same year: Craig Wood (1941), Ben Hogan (1951, 1953), Arnold Palmer (1960), Jack Nicklaus (1972), Tiger Woods (2002) and Jordan Spieth (2015).
 
PURSE
The 2018 purse was $12 million; the winner earned $2.16 million. The 2019 purse will total $12.5 million, highest among golf’s major championships.
 
TELEVISION COVERAGE
The U.S. Open will receive more than 46 hours of network coverage on FOX and FS1. The “Epics” film series will be part of U.S. Open coverage. Tiger Woods’ record-setting performance in the 2000 U.S. Open at Pebble Beach will be featured. Rolex will be the exclusive presenting partner of coverage for seven USGA championships, including the final hour of Sunday’s U.S. Open coverage. Rolex’s commitment will allow an uninterrupted broadcast of these championships, providing fans hours of continuous live action.
                                     
Date             Network                                   Broadcast Hours (Local/EDT)
June 9          FOX                                          Epics – Tigers Woods 2000 U.S. Open, 4:30-5:30 p.m.
June 12        FS1                                           Wednesday at the U.S. Open, 12:30-3 p.m.
                     FS1                                           Epics – Tigers Woods 2000 U.S. Open, 7-8 p.m.
June 13        FS1                                           First Round, 12:30-7:30 p.m.
                     FOX                                          First Round, 7:30-10:30 p.m.
June 14        FS1                                           Second Round, 12:30-7:30 p.m.
                     FOX                                          Second Round, 7:30-10:30 p.m.
June 15        FOX                                          Third Round, Noon-10 p.m.
June 16        FOX                                          Fourth Round, 2-10 p.m.
 
 
LIVE STREAMING COVERAGE
The U.S. Open will receive 117 hours of live streaming coverage on the us.open.com and U.S. Open app channels.
                                     
Date             Channel                                     Broadcast Hours (Local/EDT)
June 13        usopen.com/U.S. Open app       First Round, featured groups 1, 10 a.m. – 9:30 p.m.
                                                                        First Round, featured groups 2, 10 a.m. – 9:30 p.m.
                                                                        First Round, featured holes, 10 a.m. – 9:30 p.m.
June 14        usopen.com/U.S. Open app       Second Round, featured groups 1, 10 a.m. – 9:30 p.m.
                                                                        Second Round, featured groups 2, 10 a.m. – 9:30 p.m.
                                                                        Second Round, featured holes, 10 a.m. – 9:30 p.m.
June 15        usopen.com/U.S. Open app       Third Round, featured groups 1, Noon – 9 p.m.
                                                                         Third Round, featured groups 2, Noon – 9 p.m.
                                                                         Third Round, featured holes, Noon – 9 p.m.
June 17         usopen.com/U.S. Open app       Fourth Round, featured groups 1, 2–9 p.m.
                                                                         Fourth Round, featured groups 2, 2–9 p.m.
                                                                         Fourth Round, featured holes, 2–9 p.m.

PEBBLE BEACH GOLF LINKS NOTES
  • Pebble Beach Golf Links has hosted the U.S. Open Championship in five consecutive decades
  • The 119th U.S. Open is the 13th USGA championship to be conducted at the resort
  • The 2019 U.S. Open will be the 13th played in California and sixth at Pebble Beach Golf Links
  • Pebble Beach Golf Links will also host the 2023 U.S. Women’s Open and the 2027 U.S. Open
  • The AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am, a PGA Tour event, has been held at the resort since 1947
  • Pebble Beach Golf Links has served as host of a PGA Tour Champions event since 2004
  • Pebble Beach Golf Links is celebrating its centennial in 2019.
 
PEBBLE BEACH HISTORY
Pebble Beach Golf Links is part of the famous 17-Mile Drive, which was originally designed as a local excursion route for visitors to the Del Monte to take in the historic sights of Monterey and Pacific Grove and the scenery of what would become Pebble Beach. The course was designed by Jack Neville and Douglas Grant and opened on Feb. 22, 1919. Neville’s objective was to place as many of the holes as possible along the Monterey coastline and he accomplished this by using a “figure 8” layout. The first professional tournament held at Pebble Beach was the 1926 Monterey Peninsula Open. In 1929, the course hosted the U.S. Amateur Championship for the first time. In 1947, Pebble Beach became one of the host courses for the Bing Crosby National Pro-Am, which is currently known as the PGA Tour’s AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am. Pebble Beach has hosted 12 USGA championships, including five U.S. Opens and five U.S. Amateurs, and was the site of the 1977 PGA Championship. The course has also hosted the PGA Tour Champions’ PURE Insurance Championship since 2004.
 
USGA CHAMPIONSHIPS AT PEBBLE BEACH
1929 U.S. Amateur: H.R. "Jimmy" Johnston def. Dr. O.F. Willing, 4 and 3
1940 U.S. Women’s Amateur: Betty Jameson def. Jane S. Cothran, 6 and 5
1947 U.S. Amateur: Robert H. (Skee) Riegel def. John W. Dawson, 2 and 1
1948 U.S. Women’s Amateur: Grace S. Lenczyk def. Helen Sigel, 4 and 3
1961 U.S. Amateur: Jack Nicklaus def. H. Dudley Wysong Jr., 8 and 6
1972 U.S. Open: Jack Nicklaus by three strokes over Bruce Crampton (290-293)
1982 U.S. Open: Tom Watson by two strokes over Jack Nicklaus (282-284)
1992 U.S. Open: Tom Kite by two strokes over Jeff Sluman (285-287)
1999 U.S. Amateur: David Gossett def. Sung Yoon Kim, 9 and 8
2000 U.S. Open: Tiger Woods by 15 strokes over Ernie Els, Miguel Angel Jimenez (272-287)
2010 U.S. Open: Graeme McDowell by one stroke over Gregory Havret (284-285)
2018 U.S. Amateur: Viktor Hovland def. Devon Bling, 6 and 5
 
OTHER CHAMPIONSHIPS AT PEBBLE BEACH
1977 PGA Championship: Lanny Wadkins def. Gene Littler (282-4-4-4, 282-4-4-x)
 
MOST USGA CHAMPIONSHIPS HOSTED BY A CLUB (includes 2019 U.S. Open)
18         Merion G.C., Ardmore, Pa.
16         Baltusrol G.C., Springfield, N.J.
16         The Country Club, Brookline, Mass.
16         Oakmont (Pa.) C.C.
13         Pebble Beach (Calif.) G.L.
12         Chicago G.C., Wheaton, Ill.
12         Winged Foot G.C., Mamaroneck, N.Y.
11         Oakland Hills C.C., Bloomfield Hills, Mich.
10        The Olympic Club, San Francisco, Calif.

USGA CHAMPIONSHIPS IN CALIFORNIA
This will be the 83rd USGA championship played in California and the 13th U.S. Open contested in the state. In 2021, the U.S. Women’s Open will be held at The Olympic Club (Lake Course) in San Francisco. The 2023 U.S. Women’s Open will be played at Pebble Beach Golf Links.
 
U.S. Open Championships in California (12):
1948: The Riviera Country Club, Pacific Palisades (Ben Hogan)
1955: The Olympic Club (Lake Course), San Francisco (Jack Fleck)
1966: The Olympic Club (Lake Course), San Francisco (Billy Casper)
1972: Pebble Beach Golf Links, Pebble Beach (Jack Nicklaus)
1982: Pebble Beach Golf Links, Pebble Beach (Jack Nicklaus)
1987: The Olympic Club (Lake Course), San Francisco (Scott Simpson)
1992: Pebble Beach Golf Links, Pebble Beach (Tom Kite)
1998: The Olympic Club (Lake Course), San Francisco (Lee Janzen)
2000: Pebble Beach Golf Links, Pebble Beach (Tiger Woods)
2008: Torrey Pines Golf Course (South Course), San Diego (Tiger Woods)
2010: Pebble Beach Golf Links, Pebble Beach (Graeme McDowell)
2012: The Olympic Club (Lake Course), San Francisco (Webb Simpson)
 
U.S. Amateur Championships in California (10):
1929: Del Monte Golf & Country Club, Pebble Beach (H.R. "Jimmy" Johnston def. Dr. O.F. Willing, 4 and 3)
1947: Del Monte Golf & Country Club, Pebble Beach (Robert H. “Skee” Riegel def. John W. Dawson, 2 and 1)
1958: The Olympic Club (Lake Course), San Francisco (Charles R. Coe def. Tommy Aaron, 5 and 4)
1961: Pebble Beach Golf Links, Pebble Beach (Jack Nicklaus def. H. Dudley Wysong Jr., 8 and 6)
1976: Bel-Air Country Club, Los Angeles (Bill Sander def. C. Parker Moore Jr., 8 and 6)
1981: The Olympic Club (Lake Course), San Francisco (Nathaniel Crosby def. Brian Lindley, 37 holes)
1999: Pebble Beach Golf Links, Pebble Beach (David Gossett def. Sung Yoon Kim., 9 and 8)
2007: The Olympic Club (Lake Course), San Francisco (Colt Knost def. Michael Thompson, 2 and 1)
2017: The Riviera Country Club, Pacific Palisades (Doc Redman def. Doug Ghim, 37 holes)
2018: Pebble Beach Golf Links, Pebble Beach (Viktor Hovland def. Devon Bling, 6 and 5)
 
2010 U.S. OPEN
Graeme McDowell carded a final-round, 3-over-par 74 to earn a one-stroke victory over Frenchman Gregory Havret at even-par 284, thus ending a 40-year European drought in the U.S. Open Championship. England’s Tony Jacklin was the last European to claim the title, in 1970 at Hazeltine National Golf Club in Chaska, Minn. McDowell became the first golfer from Northern Ireland to win a USGA championship. Ernie Els was third at 286 and Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson shared fourth at 287. With third-round leader Dustin Johnson struggling to an 82 over his final 18 holes, McDowell steadied his game. He birdied the par-4 fifth to reach 4 under par for the championship and did not make any critical mistakes, despite registering four bogeys coming in. Havret, a sectional qualifier, came up short in his bid to force an 18-hole playoff on Monday with a bogey on the 71st hole and a missed 9-foot birdie putt on the par-5 18th.
 
2000 U.S. OPEN
Tiger Woods lapped the field and was the lone player under par when he finished at 12-under-par 272 and was an incredible 15 strokes ahead of Ernie Els and Miguel Angel Jimenez. Woods led by one stroke after the first round (65), by six after the second round (134) and by 10 after the third round (205). He played the first 22 holes and the last 26 holes without a bogey and did not have a single three-putt during the championship. Woods, who won the first of his third U.S. Open titles, made his move early with a bogey-free first round. Foggy conditions delayed play on Friday, and Woods managed just 12 holes before his second round was halted by darkness. Still, he finished birdie-birdie and slept on a six-shot lead over Jimenez. While Woods’ brilliance was on display, this was also a farewell to four-time champion Jack Nicklaus who competed in his 44th and final U.S. Open.
 
1992 U.S. OPEN
Tom Kite shot an even-par 72 on the final day to finish with a 72-hole score of 3-under 275 and win by two strokes over runner-up Jeff Sluman. Kite and the field battled wind gusts up to 40 miles per hour in Sunday’s cold and testing conditions. Only five players broke par for the day and 20 others failed to break 80. In the third round, Gil Morgan made U.S. Open history when he became the first player to reach 10 under. He eventually struggled to a 77 but still held the 54-hole lead at 4-under 212. Morgan would relinquish the top spot to Kite in the final round with a double-bogey 6 on No. 4. Kite added to his lead with a 25-foot birdie on the sixth and played a delicate wedge that hit the flagstick and fell in for a birdie on the par-3 seventh. Kite would stay ahead with birdies at holes 12 and 14 to offset bogeys at Nos. 16 and 17 and record the lone major championship of his career.
 
1982 U.S. OPEN
In a memorable finish, Tom Watson made birdie on the 17th hole when he chipped in from off the green to edge Jack Nicklaus. Watson, who posted a four-round total of 6-under 282, drew his 2-iron off the tee in between two bunkers and then proceeded to hole his sand wedge from 18 feet. He carefully played the par-5 18th before sinking a 20-foot birdie putt for a two-stroke victory. Nicklaus, who birdied the 15th to tie Watson for the lead, parred the last three holes for a 69 and a 72-hole score of 284. Meanwhile, Watson had moved ahead with a 35-foot birdie putt from the fringe on the par-5 14th but then fell back into a tie with a bogey 5 on No. 16. Bruce Devlin, at age 44, led the championship after 36 holes but Watson made his move with a third-round 68 and shared the 54-hole lead with Bill Rogers, who won the 1981 Open Championship at Royal St. George’s.
 
1972 U.S. OPEN
Jack Nicklaus won his third U.S. Open at Pebble Beach Golf Links, which was hosting the championship for the first time. His 72-hole score of 2-over 290 was three strokes ahead of Bruce Crampton and four better than Arnold Palmer. A key moment in the final round came when Nicklaus, who won the Masters two months earlier, stood over an 8-foot bogey putt on the 12th hole at the same time Palmer attempted a 10-foot birdie putt on No. 14. Nicklaus’ went in while Palmer’s missed in the Golden Bear maintained a one-shot lead. Nicklaus, who either led or was tied for the lead throughout the championship, followed with three pars and a birdie. He then hit the flagstick on 218-yard, par-3 17th with a 1-iron that left him with a 6-inch birdie putt and a four-stroke cushion.
 
FUTURE U.S. OPENS
June 18-21, 2020: Winged Foot Golf Club (West Course), Mamaroneck, N.Y.
June 17-20, 2021: Torrey Pines Golf Course (South Course), San Diego, Calif.
June 16-19, 2022: The Country Club, Brookline, Mass.
June 15-18, 2023: Los Angeles (Calif.) Country Club (North Course)
June 13-16, 2024: Pinehurst Resort & Country Club, Village of Pinehurst, N.C.
June 12-15, 2025: Oakmont (Pa.) Country Club
June 18-21, 2026: Shinnecock Hills Golf Club, Southampton, N.Y.
June 17-20, 2027: Pebble Beach (Calif.) Golf Links
 
LONGEST U.S. OPEN COURSES
7,845 yards, Erin Hills, first round, Erin, Wis., 2017
7,839 yards, Erin Hills, second round, Erin, Wis., 2017
7,818 yards, Erin Hills, third round, Erin, Wis., 2017
7,721 yards, Erin Hills, fourth round, Erin, Wis., 2017
7,695 yards, Chambers Bay, second round, University Place, Wash., 2015
7,637 yards, Chambers Bay, third round, University Place, Wash., 2015
7,603 yards, Torrey Pines G.C. (South Course), second round, San Diego, Calif., 2008
7,514 yards, Congressional C.C. (Blue Course), first round, Bethesda, Md., 2011
7,497 yards, Chambers Bay, first round, University Place, Wash., 2015
7,476 yards, Torrey Pines G.C. (South Course), first round, San Diego, Calif., 2008
 
LONGEST PAR 3s IN U.S. OPEN HISTORY
300 yards, 8th, fourth round, Oakmont (Pa.) C.C., 2007
299 yards, 8th, fourth round, Oakmont (Pa.) C.C., 2016
281 yards, 8th, second round, Oakmont (Pa.) C.C., 2007
281 yards, 8th, second round, Oakmont (Pa.) C.C., 2016
279 yards, 8th, third round, Oakmont (Pa.) C.C., 2007
266 yards, 3rd, fourth round, Merion G.C. (East Course), Ardmore, Pa., 2013
264 yards, 2nd, first round, Shinnecock Hills G.C., Southampton, N.Y., 2018
261 yards, 8th, first round, Oakmont (Pa.) C.C., 2007
258 yards, 8th, first round, Oakmont (Pa.) C.C., 2016
256 yards, 3rd, third round, The Olympic Club (Lake Course), San Francisco, Calif., 2012
 
LONGEST PAR 4s IN U.S. OPEN HISTORY
551 yards, 13th, second round, Chambers Bay, University Place, Wash., 2015
544 yards, 11th, second round, Chambers Bay, University Place, Wash., 2015
542 yards, 4th, third round, Pinehurst R. & C.C. (Course No. 2), Village of Pinehurst, N.C., 2014
541 yards, 11th, first round, Chambers Bay, University Place, Wash., 2015
541 yards, 11th, fourth round, Chambers Bay, University Place, Wash., 2015
536 yards, 14th, first round, Shinnecock Hills G.C., Southampton, N.Y., 2018
534 yards, 14th, third round, Chambers Bay, University Place, Wash., 2015
533 yards, 13th, third round, Chambers Bay, University Place, Wash., 2015
530 yards, 11th, third round, Chambers Bay, University Place, Wash., 2015
529 yards, 14th, third round, Shinnecock Hills G.C., Southampton, N.Y., 2018
 
LONGEST PAR 5s IN U.S. OPEN HISTORY
684 yards, 12th, first round, Oakmont (Pa.) C.C., 2016
681 yards, 18th, fourth round, Erin Hills, Erin, Wis., 2017
676 yards, 18th, second round, Erin Hills, Erin, Wis., 2017
674 yards, 12th, third round, Oakmont (Pa.) C.C., 2016
671 yards, 16th, third round, The Olympic Club (Lake Course), San Francisco, Calif., 2012
667 yards, 12th, first round, Oakmont (Pa.) C.C., 2007
667 yards, 12th, second round, at Oakmont (Pa.) C.C., 2007
667 yards, 12th, fourth round, Oakmont (Pa.) C.C., 2007
667 yards, 18th, third round, Erin Hills, Erin, Wis., 2017
660 yards, 16th, first round, The Olympic Club (Lake Course), San Francisco, Calif., 2012
 
THE LAST TIME IT HAPPENED AT THE U.S. OPEN
Martin Kaymer: last international winner (2014)
Brooks Koepka: last to defend title (2018)
Francis Ouimet: last winner in his first attempt (1913)
Webb Simpson: last winner in his second attempt (2012)
Martin Kaymer: last start-to-finish winner with no ties (2014)
Jordan Spieth.: last winner to birdie the 72nd hole to win by one stroke (2015)
Dustin Johnson: last winner to birdie the 72nd hole (2016)
Tiger Woods: last winner to birdie the 72nd hole to force a playoff (2008)
Geoff Ogilvy: last winner without a round in the 60s (2006)
Rory McIlroy: last winner with all rounds in the 60s (2011)
Brooks Koepka: last winner between ages 20-29 (28 in 2018)
Dustin Johnson: last winner between ages 30-39 (31 in 2016)
Payne Stewart: last winner age 40 and higher (42 in 1999)
Dustin Johnson: last defending champion to miss the cut (2017)
Hale Irwin: last winner who received a special exemption (1990)
Lucas Glover: last winner to come through sectional qualifying (2009)
Orville Moody: last winner to come through local and sectional qualifying (1969)
John Goodman: last amateur winner (1933)

MAJOR CHAMPIONSHIP SCHEDULE
With the PGA Tour schedule reordered in 2018-19 the Masters Tournament and PGA Championship were played before the U.S. Open for the fifth time. This last occurred in 1971 when the PGA was held in the month of February prior to the Masters.
1937 – Masters (April 1-4, Byron Nelson), PGA (May 24-30, Denny Shute), U.S. Open (June 10-12, Ralph Guldahl)
1948 – Masters (April 8-11, Claude Harmon), PGA (May 19-25, Ben Hogan), U.S. Open (June 10-12, Ben Hogan)
1949 – Masters (April 7-10, Sam Snead), PGA (May 25-31, Ben Hogan), U.S. Open (June 9-11, Cary Middlecoff)
1971 – PGA (Feb. 25-28, Jack Nicklaus), Masters (April 8-11, Charles Coody), U.S. Open (June 17-21, Lee Trevino)
 
CHAMPIONSHIP TROPHY
The first United States Open Championship was won by Horace Rawlins in September 1895 at Newport Country Club in Rhode Island. As the victor, Rawlins earned $150, a gold champion’s medal, and use of the championship sterling silver cup for one year. The trophy was designated for display at Rawlins’ club until presented to the next year’s champion. Thus begun a perennial rite that has endured for more than a century.
 
The original two-handled cup was destroyed by fire in September 1946 at Lloyd Mangrum’s home country club, Tam O’Shanter, outside of Chicago. The USGA considered replacing it with a new design, but opted instead to preserve the look of the original with a full-scale replica on April 24, 1947. This replica remained in service, passed from champion to champion until 1986, when it was permanently retired to the USGA Golf Museum. Today, the U.S. Open champion receives possession of the 1986 full-scale replica. The original U.S. Open Trophy is on display at the USGA Golf Museum in Far Hills, N.J.

TICKETS
2019 U.S. Open tickets are available online at usopen.com. Trophy Club, weekly gallery and daily gallery tickets can be purchased and include complimentary parking and shuttle transportation to and from the championship entrance. Questions can be directed to ticketquestions@usga.org or by phone at 800-698-0661.

MERCHANDISE
2019 U.S. Open merchandise is available online at usgashop.com.

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